Xbox One Elite Controller Review

I’m no professional gamer. I know this. I also know that I probably don’t need a controller like the new Xbox One Elite controller. I knew I wanted one though and get one I did. When it arrived, I was pretty excited to see what the talk about professional controllers really meant. The one word that immediately comes to mind when I think about the Xbox One Elite Controller is this. “Quality”.

The quality of this product is immediately evident when opening the box and staring back at you is not a plastic controller in a molded plastic bed. No. What you see is a black nylon hardshell zip up case with the XBox logo emblazoned on the front. Below that is USB cable that also feels far superior in quality when compared to about 99% of the other USB charge cables and you get a set of AA batteries… Wait.. What?!? No rechargeable battery pack? Fine. That’s something I was able to overlook for the time being. I had saved the best for last and needed to get at that controller.

After unzipping the case, I’m greeted by a sleek and sexy looking black and silver controller (seriously no color even on the face buttons Just shades of grey)staring back at me with piece of foam between the hand grips housing 2 more sets of thumb sticks, one set curved at the top similar to the Sony Dual Shock and taller than standard Xbox and a standard looking Dpad. When picking up the controller in my hand for the first time I could immediately feel that this was not your typical Xbox controller. From it’s weight, to the rubberized grips to the satin like finish on the remainder of the controller the strong magnetization of the swapable metal components this controller was the nicest controller I’d ever laid hands on.

The metal paddles on the underside of the controller never made much sense to me but after trying it out for a little bit, I can already see why pro gamers prefer a configuration such as this as it allows them to keep moving with their sticks and firing with the paddles without having to stop moving one way or the other. For sure an advantage to those who participate in lots of competitive fragging. It takes some time to figure it out and admittedly I wasn’t doing really great with it but I plan to get back to trying them out more in the future.

Wrapping up, the Elite Controller for Xbox One is amazing. The finish, the packaging and configuration all screams “high quality”. If you aren’t an elite competitive gamer this controller may not be for you. And that’s OK. It retails for $149.99USD and that’s one hell of a high cost for a regular every day gamer but if you, like me, enjoy some of the finer things in life (more expensive beers and wines to name a few) you just might be able to justify the expense as the last controller you buy for the Xbox One. There is one thing to mention as I kinda glossed over it at the beginning. The simple fact that a $150+ controller doesn’t come with a rechargeable battery is something of an oversight that shouldn’t have happened and that happens to be one and only thing preventing the controller from getting a perfect 10 out of 10 score.

Feed Your Console gives the XBox One Elite Controller a 9.5 out of 10.

Review – Fallout 4 (Xbox One)

My hands shook and my stomach churned in excitement as I feverishly tore into the package before me. All I could think was “Finally – the day has come”. The day I’d been waiting for, for what seemed like a lifetime. Today was the day that the latest installment of my favorite game franchise Fallout 4 arrived and I could barely stand the wait and I paced back and forth waiting for the install to finish.

Fallout for me has always been a world I can get lost in. That goes back to the days of the original. I’ve played through fallout 3 and New Vegas 3 times a piece each time differently than the last and each time took no less than 80 hours so to say that excitement that filled the air in the days leading up to release was high to say the least.

In typical fashion of the Feed Your Console team, we will endeavor to avoid spoilers despite there being countless sites out there who divulge the game’s story. The basis of the story sets the player on a mission to find who took his/her son and for what purpose did this happen. For the first time in the franchise, we’re treated to protagonist who not only has a voice but can be a woman as well. In the beginning of the game when setting up your character, players are met with an incredibly powerful character creation tool which morphs the main protagonist’s face in unimaginable ways (See link for some amazing examples). From there, we’re placed smack dab in middle of a pre-war suburban area set within the series’ 50s-esque era. It doesn’t take long to throw you into the world of Fallout with the bombs beginning to drop, the player and his family must run through the streets to their local Vault-Tec vault for protection.

One thing to that’s always struck me as funny about the Fallout series is it’s ability to set you on track to a main story yet distract you from the main mission so easily. I was bound and determined that I would focus heavily on the main quest then after, I’d jump back into the game and continue doing the side missions. That last all of 45 minutes as I suddenly found myself spending no less than 3 hours screwing around in my first settlement.

The team at Bethesda has made a plethora of changes to the games some of which I loved and some, I have to say I wasn’t overly thrilled with. The combat system is still as awesome as it ever was with a few changes. Actually playing the game without utilizing the VATS system is a completely viable option now whereas in previous games it felt much to cumbersome and I rarely ever did in 3 or New Vegas. It just gives the game a whole new feel. VATS has changed a little as well in that now instead of freezing time, time slows down AND the player manually triggers a critical hit after their meter has filled up. It’s no longer a random successful critical hit.

More companions! You read that right. There are 13 companions to find throughout the vast expanses of this wasteland. Each with their own unique style, missions and dialogue help to keep the game fresh and exciting over multiple play-throughs. My personal favorites are Strong, the Supermutant, Nick Valentine the old school private investigator and Dogmeat the ..well… German Sheppard.

Settlements – Perhaps the single biggest addition to the game is the ability to find and build settlements. If you’re the Minecraft/creation gamer, this is going to be your thing. Basically, settlements are found and built from the ground up using supplies you find and break down in the wastelands. Seriously – Everything has a purpose now including pre-war money all the way to the cleaning solvents. It can all be broken down into it’s base components and turned into something else which you can use to rebuild civilization within your settlements. When building your settlements, the people will demand things and they look to you to provide for them. They need water, crops, defense, beds all of this falls to your shoulders. At times when out exploring, you’ll be notified that one of your settlements is struggling and needs help. If you wait too long, you will lose settlers. For some reason Bethesda opted to leave us to our own devices when figuring out how to set up supply lines and their importance. I feel the settlement building needed a solid tutorial. Chances are someone like me would probably have spent more time mucking about in the building options.

Another aspect of establishing your settlements, you must build. I’m not a Minecraft fan. I don’t understand the appeal or the success. Maybe that’s dating me and I’m showing my age but building things in games is not something I have any desire to do. Not in Halo’s Forge, not in Minecraft and not in the Sims. For Fallout though, I was game to give it the old college try and try I did. I literally spent an entire day travelling, scavenging, scrapping, selling, sleeping… Rinse repeat for 9 hours bound and determined this was going to be the game that got me on board with building things in my games. After all that time, I spent no more than 30 minutes struggling with how to build a simple home with power and lights and furnishings. The game beat me. I tapped out. I found that building wasn’t as intuitive as it first looked in the videos online. I couldn’t get the lights to power on in my house save for 1 lowly light in the middle room. I have no idea what I did but I stopped frustrated.

The leveling system has been tweaked a fair amount. Instead of earning skill points and perk levels, now the player gets a single perk point for each level they gain and that point is put into one of the various basic skills OR they can apply the point to a more focused perk (“Bloody Mess” for example) some of which have minimum level (ie:lvl 21) AND skill level (Strength lvl 8). Some people will find this to be a more focused and streamlined level system, I for one was mostly impartial but it did feel to me like my character was vastly under powered or unable to do certain things by the time I had reached a character level 20.

Weapon/Armor crafting and modification also makes it’s debut in Fallout 4. Gone are the days of weapon/armor degradation (Except for the Power Armor). Now by using specific work shops, Weapons can also be modified and created using parts found across the wasteland or the parts and pieces from scavenging. You can also find legendary items during gun fights with Raiders, super mutants etc. This is a fun and extremely welcome addition to the franchise and I would really like to see Bethesda expand on this feature going forward. Perhaps some sort of system to combine items to create highly specialized weapons and armor.

A major issue I have with the game comes from the dialogue system and Karma system. Let’s start with dialogue. It’s too basic. In previous games, your relationship with townsfolk and other NPCs could directly be affected by the choices made within the dialogue system. It could also affect your karma as being a good guy or a bad guy. Which brings me to the Karma system. There is none. It’s gone the way of the Do-Do Bird. At least it appears to me that it’s long gone. When I act like a jerk, my NPC might hate that or they might love it. None of that matters though because you can always have a romantic relationship with your followers (not all of them thankfully).Why they would make the decision to scrap one of the most fun little pieces of the franchise. I can only speculate that it was omitted to allow for simpler decision making by the new generation of Fallout players. I feel these 2 changes were huge missteps by the team.

Graphically I think the game looks outstanding. I know the engine is a little old and even a little tired but I’m not understanding the chatter on the internet about how people think the games graphics are terrible. They’re not. Granted they aren’t up to spec with some of the other titles out there on Xbox One/PS4/PC but I’ve never expected that from Bethesda. In over 60 hours of gameplay, I’ve noticed some framerate dips and a few hilarious graphical glitches but I don’t feel that is something that deserves much time on.

When Fallout 4 was announced I was hoping for a big, engaging game that was worthy of $70(the standard going rate for games here in Canada now). I wanted long game play, a massive world to do some serious exploration in, more guns, explosions with an engaging story and side quests. I wanted the new title to be something I fell asleep and had dreams about. What I got was exactly what I had hoped for. If there’s one game you play this year, make it Fallout 4. I’ve yet to get a game that packs so much punch for such a small price compared with other games out there today. Hats off to the team at Bethesda once again. Now… Please sir – May I have another?

Feed Your Console gives Fallout 4 an enthusiastic 9 out of 10

LEGO Dimensions: “Endless Awesome” Launch Trailer

Lego Dimensions

What do you get when you cross the Lego Game universe and the functionality of the Skylander-like portal – You get “LEGO Dimensions”.

Catch the Launch trailer here:



Available Sunday, September 27, LEGO Dimensions will allow players to not only experience worlds based on DC Comics, The Lord of the Rings, The LEGO Movie, LEGO Ninjago, Back to the Future, The Wizard of Oz, Scooby-Doo! LEGO Chima, Doctor Who, Jurassic World, Ghostbusters, The Simpsons, Portal and Midway Arcade, but also combine different characters and re-buildable vehicles and gadgets from these worlds in any way that they choose – there are no rules. Imagine Kai, the Ninjago ninja, driving the Mystery Machine through Metropolis or Legolas battling ghosts alongside Homer Simpson in New York!

The LEGO Dimensions Starter Pack includes the videogame, bricks to build the LEGO Gateway, three LEGO Minifigures including Batman, Gandalf and Wyldstyle, plus the LEGO Batmobile, and the revolutionary LEGO Toy Pad. The Toy Pad allows players to transport LEGO Dimensions minifigures and models into the game, as well as control in-game action and solve puzzles by moving the physical toys. Plus, every LEGO vehicle and gadget in LEGO Dimensions can be physically rebuilt twice, for a total of three different objects, each with unique in-game abilities, which adds massive variety to the gameplay.

Review – Ori and the Blind Forest

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When Ori and the Blind Forest was first shown off at E3, I think everyone immediately sat up with interest based on the sizzle reel they showed. It was a beautiful looking old school side scrolling platformer with stunning audio, and an engaging atmosphere. The buzz surrounding Moon Studios new was immediate.

Admittedly, I sort of forgot about Ori – not because it was forgettable, mostly because I have the memory of a guppie these days but when I saw the launch trailer I was jazzed about the game again and rightfully so. Ori and the Blind Forest puts the player in control of Ori a white forest guardian who became lost at birth and raised by another creature of the forest as it’s own. One day, an evil force appears turning Ori’s life upside down forcing him to venture out to fix what’s gone wrong. The story’s narrative is told by subtitles with a narrator talking over the background in a foreign tongue that I’m sure Ori and the other creatures of the Blind Forest can understand

The controls are absolutely SPECTACULAR. I found that controlling Ori was tight and overall flawless. It was so good, I found myself continually second guessing what I was doing and where I was headed only to see that I had executed my moves correctly but screwed myself over time and time again. Moving Ori from one point to another while avoiding spikes or enemies can sometimes require a little bit of finesse but rest assured the he responds well to direction, which is very good because later in the game, you’ll be launching Ori through sections of the game and tight controls are a must.

As the game progresses, the gamer will learn new moves by killing enemies, finding secrets and leveling up his skills. Each skill becomes an important piece of Ori’s arsenal of moves as each one presents the ability to overcome different challenges (ie: double jump or the ability to wall jump just to name a few). The game itself hearkens back to the platformers from the 80’s (boy am I ever dating myself here) on the NES (think Metroid or Castlevania). The world is quite large with areas locked away until Ori learns specific moves or finds enough keys to unlock the doors.

They can also create their own save points called “Soul Links” which the player can use at will so long as their meter has filled up by finding orbs of light. Personally I found the ability to save when I wanted both a refreshing and frustrating experience. Due to the fact that so many of the puzzles and levels require trial and error, you’ll find yourself dying multiple times often coming to the realization that you’d either forgotten to save or was unable to save. Frustrating at times? Absolutely. Game breaking? Not a chance.

Ori and the Blind Forest is a charming little title that is an absolute pleasure to play through. Not only is it beautiful, but it’s challenging and fun to play.

Feed Your Console gives Ori and the Blind Forest a 9 out of 10

Pros:
Stunning Animation and graphics
Responsive controls
Emotional Story and outstanding music

Cons:
Trial and error puzzles can be extremely frustrating and plentiful

Review – Halo: Master Chief Collection Part 1(Campaigns)

Before you continue – know this. I have ONLY spent about an hours worth of time with the Multiplayer and therefore don’t feel it’s the right time to comment on it. The 15GB patch was supposed to be out earlier this week but was delayed and it wasn’t until yesterday that I had the opportunity to play with some member of the 343 team. AWESOME guys there.

My relationship with the Halo series has been going on longer than most people’s marriages. In the past 13yrs I’ve played everything in the franchise, I’ve read books and I was even there when the online gaming community was forever changed with the release of Halo 2 on Xbox Live! I still have a copy of every game(Except Anniversary edition) and every year when when spring cleaning comes around I think “this is the year I’m going to treat myself to a Halo gaming marathon” and here we are. I’ve done it thanks to Halo: Master Chief Collection.

Firing up the series – got me a little giddy. I was finally reliving the series from start to finish but with updated graphics and man have they ever outdone themselves. Halo Anniversary Edition, which I did NOT own was immediately apparent to me just all the work they had done. The sound was cleaner, lighting fresher and more dynamic. Want to see just how big a difference there is? There’s even a button that loads the original sound and video files which I found to be a little piece of genius. The Halo 3 and Halo 4 were noticeably cleaner looking but nowhere near the same jump as the previous 2. Needless to say from a graphical and sound point of view – they’ve done an amazing job though admittedly, I did notice some considerable framerate slowdown when fighting the flood making them pop in Halo 1. That may have been corrected in the latest patch but I haven’t gone back to it to check. The rest of the game is silky smoothe.

While playing through the MASSIVE collection , memories of college came flooding back to me. The wonder and excitement and remembering who I was playing certain levels with and where I was even during these moments was a piece of nostalgia bliss. HOWEVER, also with some of these memories came rushing back to me with some of the frustrations I had with the series. In the original title there’s no real direction ever given and I found myself wasting time and wandering around like a fool more than a few occasions just like I did 13yrs ago in the EXACT same places. I struggled with the flood, unable to find health packs (admittedly I had forgotten about them many times) JUST like I did so many years ago and the long slog through Halo 2’s ‘Gravemind’. When talking to the guys at 343 during our playthrough, I asked about that and they confirmed what I had already known and that was they wanted to keep the core gameplay exactly as it was released so many years ago.

Seeing the latest trend of rehashing/remastering games the last little while, you’ll be hard pressed to find a better value than Halo: Master Chief Collection. With over 100 MP maps 4 games that span well over 30+hrs of single player , Cooperative game play, Halo: Nightfall a VOD series, the various Halo videos that can be found throughout the games this is something that anyone will enjoy through the long months of winter ahead.

 

Feed Your Console gives Halo: Master Chief Collection a 9 out of 10

Pros:
Updated graphics and sound are amazing (check the button that switches)
120 MP maps will keep you glued to your couch
Replaying the series from start during the leadup to Halo Guardians is awesome. You may even see some new story tying directly into the VOD series and Guardians
Hour after hour this game will stay in your system for months to come

Cons:
Framerate issues during Halo 1 while fighting the flood
Navigating some levels in Halo 1 and 2 were frustrating today just as they were 13 and 10yrs ago.

Review – Sunset Overdrive

I’ve seen the Apocalypse. There are mutants at every corner chasing you. Trying to kill you.and just hell bent on destroying what little is left of humanity. It’s Dangerous.

IT’S FREAKING AWESOME!!!

The premise of Sunset Overdrive is simple. It’s set in Sunset City, where the evil company Fizzco has just released it’s new energy drink which turns people into mutants. Your mission is to escape the city and exact revenge upon Fizzco for it’s dastardly deeds. Along the way you’ll make new friends and encounter some insane boss battles and complete a variety of side missions that include forging a sword at a nuclear power plant and escorting a robotic dog back to it’s owner.

Traversing the city is where the real fun comes though. Grinding everything from power lines to running along walls to bare footing across the water Sunset Overdrive awards you for not touching the ground. At first it feels a little strange but with little effort, it just flows. I was bounding and grinding my way to decent sized combos in no time (still haven’t had managed to hit 100 – I’ll get there though). Sunset OD also rewards players who spend their time. While grinding your way through the mayhem, you’ll be rewarded with money and you’ll also come across a variety of ingredients such as toilet paper and shoes which can all be used to create new AMPS which are basically just weapon and control modifiers.

Something to take note of is that you won’t be doing much in the way of fighting from the ground as Sunset OD feels like a different game when you aren’t traversing the battles. There’s no run button and the pace of the game feels like it slows to a crawl compared to the rest of the title if you aren’t. You can likely expect to die if you spend too much time on the ground. Not that it’s a bad thing really. The respawn animations are fantastic. Admittedly, there were a few times where I died so often due to the sheer amount of bad guys coming at me that I think I literally saw every single respawn possibility.

That last point brings me to this small gripe. A few times, the overzealous nature of Sunset Overdrive literally felt a little too much. Too much bouncing and running and grinding my way through wave after wave of ODs had me finding myself way out of the zone of the mission or dying repeatedly. It’s nothing the average gamer won’t be able to handle after a few tries but it just felt a little frustrating.

Graphically – Sunset Overdrive is stunning and the artistic style is spot on. Everything just works. The world is vibrant and colorful, the mutants are amazing and killing them feels extra rewarding when you see them pop with their orange crush looking blood blow up into a cloud that literally says “POP!”

While I only had the chance to spend about 2-3hrs with Chaos Squad, the online 8 player cooperative component to Sunset Overdrive, I quite enjoyed it. It was INSANE! Imagine this – you and 7 other players, all armed to the teeth with the massive array of zany weapons from the crazy minds at Insomniac Games, squaring off in a variety of “Horde mode” style matches. Explosions, grinding, jumping, gunfire and orange soda spraying everywhere. Sounds like a lot going on at once doesn’t it? It’s crazy but lots of fun.

The latest from Insomniac Games is a lot of things. It’s an open world adventure, it’s funny, it’s crazy and it is bloody gorgeous. The boss battles are an absolute pleasure to play through, the controls are sharp, I really liked the humor in the writing and the art direction is some of the best I’ve ever seen. This is a true Next Gen title and I suspect this might be the beginning of a beautiful new friendship between Insomniac and Xbox Gamers (we’ll forget about Fuse).

Feed Your Console gives Sunset Overdrive a 9 out of 10

Pros:
Smooth controls
Stunning art direction and graphics
The Boss battles

Cons:
Sunset OD sometimes throws too much at you at once.

Disney Infinity 2.0 – Review (Xbox One)

I must admit that I never had the chance to play the original Disney Infinity, partially because it looked to be far too young for me to enjoy and still too old for my daughter who had just turned 4. This year however, things have changed in my house. My now 5yr old daughter is taking notice of games and asking to participate with my gaming so to me it was a no-brainer. Disney Infinity needed to come home this year and thankfully, we were provided a review copy by our Disney Infinity reps.

The starter kit comes with a base station, a replica of Avengers Tower and 3 members of the Avengers – Black Widow, Thor and Iron Man. The little collectible toys look sharp and feel fairly weighty. What we found in the game was something that offers little for the more seasoned gamer like myself, but, it’s a treasure box of fun and excitement for the casual and younger gamer such as my daughter.

Diving right into the game, we found ourselves in a open world version of New York. After figuring out the controls I found the fighting to be rather cumbersome with the Y button being the primary attack but after some thought, I can only assume this decision was made to accommodate the smaller hands of the target demographic. Immediately my daughter and I set out on our adventure.

It didn’t take her long to figure out how to control the camera and move about the city far better than her mother ever could and in short order, we found coins to collect which, once found, allows for other that toy (Sold separately). What we quickly learn is that Loki and the Frost Giants are trying to take over the city and turn it into their own private playground. Throughout our adventure, we met many other characters from the Marvel Universe and were given various missions within the city.

Completing missions and beating the bad guys awards the player with experience. With each level up the player can then add points to a skill tree unique to each character making every one play differently resulting in a different feeling game as we switch between them.

As much fun as my daughter and I had playing through the Avengers campaign, the real meat and potatoes of Disney Infinity 2.0 is the toy box mode. This is the player generated content mode where you get the opportunity to build your own worlds from scratch, start out with a pre-made template or just download any of the levels created by other members of the community. Some of which are genuinely amazing and a real treat to play keeping this title fun and fresh for months if not years to come.

All in all, I would say this was a very successful outing. It accomplished everything they set out to do and everything I was hoping for. A fun little title that’s great for everyone in the family young and old. There was no shortage of “WOW Dad. check this out!!” and absolute belly filled laughter as my little one picked people up flew around the city holding them and chucking them into the water, flying head first into the side of a building or just beating up the bad guys and saving the world. Tonight – I have a date with a 5yr old to do some good old fashioned bad guy smashing and I can’t wait.

Feed Your Console gives Disney Infinity 2.0 an 8 out of 10

Pros:
Accessible controls for young kids
Toy Box Mode
Split Screen multiplayer
Collectible figures are of decent quality

Cons:
Online 4 person multiplayer is restricted to Toy Box Mode only
$13 for extra characters

EA Access – 1 Month in Impressions

Today’s announcement of Need for Speed Rivals being added to the vault in the next few weeks had me thinking back on my first month of service and I felt  it was time to convey my thoughts about  the service. When EA first announced their new subscription based platform called EA Access, I was moderately apprehensive about whether or not I would subscribe. The initial offerings from “The Vault” (which is where the full free to play games are housed) were rather meek with just FIFA 14, Madden 25, Peggle 2 and Battlefield 4.

Admittedly, the summer doldrums with nothing new coming out for at least 4 weeks and the paltry price tag of just $30 for the year convinced me that I should sign up and download Battlefield and perhaps give FIFA a shot despite my dislike for professional soccer.

What I found was that FIFA is a damn good game. I am pleasantly surprised at how deep the game was and how much fun I had. Couple that with a few friends that got me playing online with them. It’s killed some late nights and rainy afternoons. Another nice added bonus of being a subscriber is you also get early access to new games and demos. For example – Starting this week, I’ll be able to get 6hrs of playtime with NHL 2015 (The demo is absolutely AMAZING) prior to the release of the game on Tuesday AND the progress made and achievements will carry over to when/if you buy the full game. Couple that with the fact that you’ll get an additional 10% discount for digital purchase – that alone is worth 1 month of service.

I know the current list of games is small – but the service is BRAND NEW. They’re already talking about making adjustments to make it more enticing. This is the future fellow gamers. Like it or not, this is test to see how we react to a subscription based model. So far – I like where we’re going.

 

Diablo 3: Ultimate Evil Edition Review – Xbox One

Here we are folks – September.

I had a truly awesome(and busy) summer. The long drought is finally over and the busy season of game launches is finally upon us.

This year’s game launches practically has 1 game a week that I’m interested in right until December and that started with the release of Diablo 3 – Ultimate Evil Edition. Basically it’s the same game that was released for the PC and Xbox 360/PS3 last year but that’s just on the surface. This version of Diablo III is a far more robust and rewarding experience this time around.

For starters, we have the obvious expansion “Reaper of Souls” which continues the story right after your hero dispatches Diablo and must now fight Malthael who is hell bent on absorbing the 7 Prime Evils souls contained within the Black Soulstone. Basically – he wants to rule the world and cause all kinds of grief for all mankind.

The next improvement comes from the Loot 2.0 system which was introduced to the PC version of Diablo 3 last year with the expansion pack. It GREATLY improves on the frequency of Rare/Set/Unique item drops making the constant hunt for new and improved weapons/armor all the more exciting.

A higher level cap has also been introduced bringing it up to 70 from 60, some revamped skills, a graphical upgrade in the form of 1080p 60FPS (Gorgeous) and my personal favorite – Adventure Mode (which is only unlocked after completing the campaign). Adventure mode allows you to take your Nephalem on bounty hunts across all the various acts in the game for reward, Cash and Nephalem Rifts which for all intents and purposes are nothing more than loot runs but you have a much higher chance at earning the really good stuff.

One last thing – Did you buy Diablo 3 for your PS3 or Xbox 360? Remember all the time and effort you spent building your character to becoming the absolute beast he/she was? Too bad you can’t use them in this version eh? Wrong – Thankfully Blizzard has heard the cries and it is 100% possible to transfer your character to the next gen system. You can even move it cross platform should you so desire.

In the end – there’s ample enough changes and features to make this a full price purchase. This is a damn fine game worthy of your time and money.

I give Diablo 3: Ultimate Evil Edition an enthusiastic 9.5 out of 10

Pros:
Higher Level Cap
Loot 2.0
Character Imports
Adventure Mode

Cons
Reaper of Souls is too Short